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Showing posts from July, 2009Show all

Magnifying Glass Pro

ByMichael McCarty-July 31, 2009Magnifying Glass Pro is one of a few screen magnifiers in the area of freeware and shareware that continues to improve by updates. Magnifying Glass Pro not only has nice features for the visually impaired like full screen magnification and caret tracking, but also contains features for those in the business holdinga presentation and for graphic designers.Most freeware and shareware utilities are very sluggish while moving the magnification, but this is not the case here. Magnifying Glass Pro differs from similar utilities with the inclusion of a unique set of features, including:Modification of an onscreen image in real time (e.g., adjust contrast, add special effects, smoothing, and so on).
Adjust the screen position of the magnifying Glass (e.g., a fixed position, under the cursor, angular, and so on).
Save multiple set of viewing preferences as individual Profiles, then switch between those Profiles instantly (e.g., you can have one Profile for viewingtext and another for worki…Post a CommentRead More »

Large Type Amelia Bedelia Books from APH

ByMichael McCarty-July 30, 2009Amelia Bedelia Goes Campingby Peggy ParishAmelia Bedelia, the very literal mixed-up maid, has never been camping before and she’s trying her best to do exactly as she’s told. Grades 1-3

Large Print (25 point):
Catalog Number: L-04436-00
Click this link to purchase Amelia Bedelia goes camping.Come Back, Amelia Bedeliaby Peggy ParishThe literal-minded maid, Amelia Bedelia, must look for a new job — Mrs. Rogers has finally had enough. Can she ever find a place to belong?

Enlarged Print (14 point):
Catalog Number: L-34197-00
Click this link to purchase Come back, Amelia Bedelia.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Cat in the Hat Books in Braille from APH

ByMichael McCarty-July 30, 2009Cat in the Hatby Dr. SeussDr. Seuss took 220 words, rhymed them, and created The Cat in the Hat, the story of the cat that transformed a dull, rainy afternoon into a magical and just-messy-enough adventure. Grades 1-3

Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-21180-00
Click this link to purchase cat in the hat.Cat in the Hat Comes Backby Dr. SeussThat behatted and bow-tied cat from Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat is back, and, not surprisingly, is up to all sorts of mischief. Grades 1-3

Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-21190-00
Click this link to purchase cat in the hat comes back!.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Curious George Books in Braille from APH

ByMichael McCarty-July 30, 2009Curious Georgeby H. A. ReyIn this, the original book about the curious monkey, George is taken from the jungle by the man in the yellow hat and his curiosity about the world leads him to adventures, and sometimes trouble. Grades 1-3

Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-28210-00
Click this link to purchase Curious George.Curious George Goes to the Hospitalby Margaret and H. A. ReyReaders learn all about the hospital as George, the curious monkey, goes in for an operation to remove the puzzle piece he has eaten. Grades 1-3

Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-28270-00
Click this link to purchase Curious George goes to the hospital.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Braille and Large Print Cookbooks from APH

ByMichael McCarty-July 30, 2009Betty Crocker’s New Cookbook: Everything You Need to Know to Cookby Betty CrockerEvery chapter contains clear and precise directions and techniques that will help you solve cooking problems whether you are an inexperienced, beginner, or intermediate cook.

Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-75760-00
Click this link to purchase Betty Crocker’s new cookbook.Beyond TV Dinners: 3 Levels of Recipes for Visually Handicapped Cooksby Patricia CanterA cookbook written especially for the visually impaired cook, from gourmet chef to novice.

Large Print (18 point):
Catalog Number: 4-02470-00

Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-13080-00
Click this link to purchase Beyond TV dinners three levels of recipes for visually handicapped cooks.Cooking Without Looking: Food Preparation Methods and Techniques for Visually Handicapped Homemakersby Esther Knudson TippsPeople who are blind or visually impaired can discover new safe ways of cooking without ruining the food or their hands in the process!

Large P…Post a CommentRead More »

Early Braille Delivery Limited Edition Art Print

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009ImageVisually impaired artist Rick Moore created Early Braille Delivery. Print is a reproduction of a pencil drawing that depicts a horse-drawn wagon leaving APH’s 1883 building to deliver braille publications to the post office. Prints are signed and numbered. Measures 14 x 18 1/2 inches and is on printed non-acidic paper. Signed version is limited to 500 copies. Note: Not available on Quota.

Art Print:
Catalog Number: W-PRINT-AA
Click this link to purchase the Early Braille Delivery Art Print.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Adult Non-Fiction Books from APH

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009Here’s just a sample of books available from the American Printing House for the Blind. For more titles visit our website: www.aph.org and click on the Louis link.

ABC’s of Braille by Bernard M. Krebs, 1973
Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-00200-00Teaches the basics of braille.

Handbook for Learning to Read Braille by Sight by Leland Schubert, 1966
Regular print:
Catalog Number: 7-51450-00

Beyond TV Dinners by Patricia Canter, 1978
Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-13080-00

Large print:
Catalog Number: 4-02470-00Includes beginning to intermediate cooking skills and recipes.

Cooking Without Looking by Esther Knudson Tipps, 1988
Large print:
Catalog Number: 4-04060-00

Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-26140-00

Self-Esteem and Adjusting with Blindness by Dean W. and Naomi R. Tuttle, 1996
Braille:
Catalog Number: 5-00500-00

Large print:
Catalog Number: L-96229-00This classic book explores: the development of self-esteem, adjusting with blindness, and fostering self-esteem. Includes material fro…Post a CommentRead More »

Tips to Prevent Purse Snatching

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009Letting your guard down, even for a second can open the door for purse snatchers, who see an easy way to grab a purse dangling from a shoulder. They grab and run before you even have time to realize that your purse has just been stolen. There are precautions you can take to discourage purse snatchers, here are some suggestions of things to do.Leave your purse at home. Carry necessary items (ID and money) in a wallet, tucked safely in your pocket. If you don’t have pockets and/or there areadditional items you prefer to carry, such as makeup, keys, and a phone, consider putting them in a bag that wraps around your stomach and can be hiddenfrom view, or a backpack strapped around both shoulders so that it can’t easily be snatched.
Bring only what you need. Don’t carry any more cash or credit cards than you absolutely need to do your shopping that day. Usually, one credit card is enough,and you should have the customer service number handy in order to report the card stol…Post a CommentRead More »

StackUps: Spatial Reasoning Using Cubes and Isometric Drawings

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009ImageStackUps encourages students to:
Recognize, name, build, draw, compare, and sort 2- and 3-dimensional shapesDescribe attributes and parts of 2- and 3-dimensional shapesInvestigate and predict the results of putting together and taking apart 2- and 3-dimensional shapes.Students can practice:
Building 3-D models using hook/loop material cubes in combination with tactile displaysUsing Mat Plans to construct and create stacked cube arrangementsInterpreting front-right-top viewsDetermining volume and surface areaIncludes:
StackUps CubesStacked Cube Arrangement CardsMat Plan CardsMat Plan Worksheets5 x 5 GridsHook/loop material Squares for use with the 5 x 5 gridsLarge Print Teacher’s GuidebookBraille Teacher’s GuidebookGuidebook CD-ROM with an interactive “StackUps Skills Checklist.”Recommended Ages: 10 years and older.
WARNING: Choking Hazard-Small Parts. Not intended for children ages 5 and under without adult supervision.

StackUps: Spatial Reasoning Using Cubes and Is…Post a CommentRead More »

Make Reading Easier with GlaReducers from APH

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009ImageEnhance contrast and reduce glare on the entire page with these 8 1/2 x 11 inch translucent vinyl sheets in pink and yellow. The sheets can be three-hole punched and inserted in a binder.

GlaReducers (pack of 4):
Catalog Number: 1-03062-00
Click this link to purchase GlaReducers from APH.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Verbal View of Online Mail

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009ImageVerbal View of Online Mail builds on the information in VV of the Net and Web, explaining how to use your computer to send email. Topics include:Microsoft Outlook Express®Mail MessagesContact InformationMail OptionsVerbal View of Online Mail
Catalog Number: D-10515-00
Click this link to purchase Verbal View of Online Mail, now ON SALE!Also Available:
Verbal View™ of Windows® XP:
Catalog Number: D-10500-00

Verbal View of Word®:
Catalog Number: D-10510-00

Verbal View of Word® Advanced:
Catalog Number: D-10511-00

Verbal View of the Net and Web:
Catalog Number: D-10512-00

Download APH Software Demos: www.aph.org/tech.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Building on Patterns: Primary Braille Literacy Program: Kindergarten Level

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009ImageBuilding on the success of Patterns: Primary Braille Reading Program, the Building on Patterns (BOP) is a complete primary literacy program designed to teach beginning braille users to read, write, and spell in braille.The Building on Patterns series addresses vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, phonemic awareness (ability to hear and interpret sounds in speech), and phonics (the association of written symbols with the sounds they represent).BOP also addresses specific skill areas needed by the child who is blind, such as language development, sound discrimination, tactual discrimination, and concept development. Braille contractions are introduced from the beginning along with sound and letter associations.Features of Building on PatternsGroups of contractions are taught together when logical to do so.Easily confused letters and words are introduced at different times.Punctuation is eliminated except for the capital at the kindergarten level and is introduced gradually thereafter.Ide…Post a CommentRead More »

Mirel’s Daughter: Braille Novel Released First

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009For the first time in history (as far as APH can determine), the braille version of a novel was released prior to the premiere of the print version to the general public.The braille edition of Mirel’s Daughter, written by Louisvillian Kay Gill, was presented to her husband, APH Board of Trustee member George Gill at APH on January 23, 2006. The print version of the novel was not launched by the author until February 15 at Spalding University in Louisville.Mirel’s Daughter tells the story of a ten-year-old girl’s remarkable survival of the pogrom massacres in Ukrainian Russia at the end of World War I, and her escape to America. A haunting novel that illustrates the destructive power of war on one family and one child, Mirel’s Daughter is written about the author’s mother, and ultimately about the triumphant power of love.Highly praised in book reviews for its poignant account of a young girl’s journey from terror to freedom, Mirel’s Daughter is an unforgett…Post a CommentRead More »

Guidelines on Presenting Accessible Powerpoint Presentations

ByMichael McCarty-July 29, 2009As you stand at the rostrum remember that your audience could be made of fellow people like yourself. Some might have refractive errors requiring the use of spectacles or contact lenses, some might have low vision or be blind, and some may have other print impairments such as dyslexia or colour blindness. What they will all share is a difficulty to follow and absorb the full impact of your impending presentation.The World Blind Union is offering some guidance on how to maximise your impact by ensuring that your presentation, and your delivery technique, is as accessible as possible to all your audience members. They contain both practical information and good-practice guidance. Remember – According to the World Health Organisation there are 314 million visually impaired people in the world today. 37 million are blind, 124 million are low vision after best correction, and 153 million are visually impaired due to uncorrected refractive error causing problems with distance vision…1 commentRead More »

Braille Book: Weight Training for Dummies

ByMichael McCarty-July 28, 2009by Liz Neporent and Suzanne SchlosbergA fitness consultant and a health writer describe more than 130 strengthening exercises, proper weight lifting techniques, and tips on designing a personal workout program. (Adult)

Braille:
Catalog Number: T-N1283-50
Click this link to purchase Weight training for dummies.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Harry Potter Books in Braille from APH

ByMichael McCarty-July 28, 2009Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stoneby J. K. RowlingOrphaned in infancy, Harry Potter is raised by cruel relatives until, to his astonishment, Harry learns that he is a wizard and has been accepted at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Book One in this popular series. (Young Adult)

Braille:
Catalog Number: T-N1187-90
Click this link to purchase Harry Potter and the sorcerer’s stone.The Sorcerer’s Companion: A Guide to the Magical World of Harry Potterby Allan Zola and Elizabeth KronzekThis guide to everything magical in the first four Harry Potter books presents the folklore, mythology, and history behind the objects, spells, and creatures in Harry’s world. (Grades 4-7)

Braille:
Catalog Number: T-N1405-30
Click this link to purchase sorcerer’s companion: a guide to the magical world of Harry Potter.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-183…Post a CommentRead More »

Braille Book: Why I Sneeze, Shiver, Hiccup, and Yawn

ByMichael McCarty-July 28, 2009by Melvin BergerThis simple introduction to automatic reflexes of the human body uses familiar examples to explain why we cough, sneeze, shiver, hiccup, yawn, and blink. (Grades 2-4)

Braille:
Catalog Number: T-N1535-70
Click this link to purchase Why I sneeze, shiver, hiccup, and yawn.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Braille Book: Terrible Speller: A Quick and Easy Guide to Enhancing your Spelling Ability

ByMichael McCarty-July 28, 2009by William ProctorA simple guide to improving spelling and pronunciation skills goes beyond memorization and drills to offer easy-to-use methods for coping with difficult words. (Adult)

Braille:
Catalog Number: T-N9607-00
Click this link to purchase terrible speller 1 a quick-and-easy guide to enhancing your spelling ability.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.org1 commentRead More »

ABCs of Braille

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009By Bernard M. KrebsABC’s of Braille is a simplified introduction to the characters and rules of English Braille geared to the requirements of children from the ages of 9-12.The plan and layout of instruction material feature a number of devices which are designed to assist both the teacher and the student.

ABCs of Braille, Braille Edition:
Catalog Number: 5-00200-00
Click this link to purchase the ABC’s of Braille.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085
Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085
Toll Free: 800-223-1839
Phone: 502-895-2405
Fax: 502-899-2274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.aph.org
APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.orgPost a CommentRead More »

Create a Catalog of Your Wardrobe

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009ImageGrowing up with a very fashion conscious mother, I became quite interested in clothing and having a varied wardrobe. While I am partially sighted with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), I am colorblind which can make picking out and matching clothes a frustration. Heaven forbid I should make a fashion “faux pas” as my mother would say. I tried to remember which colors match which, which shirts go with which skirts and which jewelry looked the best with each of my outfits. Needless to say, I found myself more and more frustrated when standing in front of my closet each morning. Sure there are tags, labels and other methods the blind can use to mark the color of each item, but because these don’t tell me what colors go well with it, my mother and I devised a system that works really well for me–a wardrobe catalog. I use a small card file box in which I keep 3 x 5-inch index cards. Each card represents one item in my closet. (No, I don’t catalog everything, but I cover m…Post a CommentRead More »

Tips For The Newly Blind Diabetic

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009Did you ever notice how life is an endless source of challenges? For me they started when I was nine and was diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes and they haven’t stopped since. It wasn’t too difficult to master drawing up my shots and taking my injections. Back in 1972 testing my urine with these bubbling tablets and cool test tubes wasn’t a huge inconvenience. Aside from that I was pretty much like most other kids, growing up with sibling rivalry, homework, girls and all the traumas of the teenage years. At seventeen I went to the Joslin Clinic in Boston and for the first time was treated by knowledgeable specialists who encouraged me to eat smaller, healthier portions and take two shots a day. Prior to this I had put minimum energy into diabetes care and this new regiment proved a difficult adjustment. Suddenly my diabetes was a larger factor in my everyday life. But I carried on, grudgingly, through high school and college. In 1989, while in graduate scho…Post a CommentRead More »

Free Voice-Dialing Services for the Blind

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009Message: hello fred!I’m working with a blind 80 something year old Veteran who asked me about cell-phones. I don’t know much about them. He would like one with voice input capacity.I’d greatly appreciate any help with this you might be able to offer. location: CaliforniaLet me begin by saying that the majority of the phones on the market today are not accessible to the blind. Menu functions like checking the status of the battery, call waiting, the call list, and the address book are almost impossible to use. There are phones that speak this information, but they are very expensive, and if he’s like me, spending several hundred dollars for a cell phone is out of the question. I always said that if I spent that kind of money, I’d drop the phone as soon as the purchase was completed.Cingular Wireless has a plan where you can get the software free if you are blind or visually impaired, but the phone costs $249, which is a lot of money for a cell phone. The…1 commentRead More »

Student Angles: Tackling Technology / Choosing A Computer

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009Computers have caused a total revamping of education and employment. While you should never allow yourself to become so dependent on technology that you are incapable of completing a task successfully without it, it would be a big mistake to ignore its significance in affording blind and visually impaired students and employees better job opportunities, added efficiency and leveling of the playing field for persons who are disabled. Whether you become acquainted with computers in school, train yourself, or receive training through a rehabilitation agency, you should take full advantage of everything your equipment has to offer. For example, if you have a braille or speech-driven notetaker, do not simply learn to use it as a notetaking device. Many notetakers can be used with an ink or braille printer, in conjunction with other computers as a voice synthesizer, and/or for transferring information or to access the Internet. Get everything you can from your technology. Adaptive tech…Post a CommentRead More »

Home Exercise Program for the Blind?

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009ImageMessage: I am looking for a book on a home exercise program designed for people who are blind?
location: west VirginiaAlthough there are no at home guides for exercise for the visually impaired, APH does sell the following product:

Going places : transition guidelines for community-based physical activities for students who have visual Impairments, blindness, or deafblindnessGoing Places is a resource guide for introducing teens and young adults to community-based, independent physical fitness activities. Designed to help foster independence and self-advocacy, it outlines a step-by-step process for choosing and participating in sports and other physical activities outside of school. Using the acronym PLACES, Going Places guides the userthrough this process: Preferences (what do you like to do?) ; …Post a CommentRead More »

Accessible Diabetes Reference Materials

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009Serving Individuals with Diabetes who are Blind or Visually Impaired: A Resource Guide for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors“Serving Individuals with Diabetes Who are Blind or Visually Impaired: A Resource Guide for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors” is a work produced by The National Federation of the Blind, in collaboration with The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) on Blindness and Low Vision at Mississippi State University. This guide is very thorough in coverage of all aspects of diabetes care and is also available in Spanish. This and other publications are available for ordering online from the Center’s website.

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision
Mississippi State University
P.O. Drawer 6189
Mississippi State, MS 39762
Phone: 662-325-2001
Fax: 662-325-8989
Web: http://www.blind.msstate.edu/pub.html<Diabetesby Gail B. StewartDiscusses the history, nature, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and …Post a CommentRead More »

Tips for Labeling Clothes

ByMichael McCarty-July 27, 2009ImageBy Dana ArdReprinted from the Winter 2000 Gem State Milestones, the newsletter of the NFB of Idaho.Editor’s Note: Learning to dress oneself is an important milestone in the independence of a child. Most kids then move to the next stage of independence in dressing – choosing their own outfits – without too much fuss. Blind kids can make this transition smoothly, too, if parents put a little advance thought and planning into a clothes labeling system.Dana Ard, a rehabilitation counselor with the Idaho Commission for the Blind, shares some helpful tips about labeling clothes in this nifty little article. In her job, Dana works mostly with newly blind adults, however, she has a lot of personal knowledge about independence for blind children. Born with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and mild cerebral palsy (CP), she was the first totally blind child to be educated entirely in the public school system in Boise, Idaho. Although the CP limits the use of her right hand, she is a go…Post a CommentRead More »More postsPowered by Blogger

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Welcome to the APH Blog, also known as Fred’s Head! This is where you’ll find information on new products, APH events and new developments in the field of blindness.

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Alison Currey
Being a Literature Students she loves to write and always kept working for the society and who really need a hand. Apart from writing she is an excellent singer herself. Have found her either reading or drawing in her free time. An inspiring personality you may want to follow at FredForum here.

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